Jasmine Wallace

Tape Painting 36 (Scape 6) – 2017
acrylic on panel
36 x 24 in
Jasmine Wallace
Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver, BC

Tape Painting 38 (Structure 5) – 2017
acrylic on panel
36 x 24 in
Jasmine Wallace
Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver, BC

Grinder Painting 20 (Grey Blue) 2017

30 x 24 in (76.2 x 60.96 cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver, BC

Grinder Painting 19 (Grey Black) 2017

30 x 24 in (76.2 x 60.96 cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver, BC

Grinder Painting 11 (White Lines 2) 2017

55 x 40in (139.7 x 101.6cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts. Vancouver, BC

Grinder Painting 18 (Blue Tints) 2017

30 x 24 in (76.2 x 60.96 cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver, BC

Grinder Painting 12 (Transformer) 2017

55 x 40in (139.7 x 101.6cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver, BC

Grinder Painting 17 (Pink Grey) 2017

30 x 24in (76.2 x 60.96 cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver, BC

Grinder Painting 16 (Green Grey) 2017

30 x 24in (76.2 x 60.96 cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver. BC

Grinder Painting 10 (Black) 2017

55 x 40in (139.7 x 101.6cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver, BC

Grinder Painting 15 (Pink Transformer) 2017

30 x 24in (76.2 x 60.96 cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z gallery Arts, Vancouver. BC

Grinder Painting 14 (Black Web) 2017

30 x 30in (76.2 x 76.2cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver. BC

Grinder Painting 13 (Green Grey) 2017

36 x 36in (91.44 x 91.44cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver. BC

Grinder Painting 9 (Dirty Pink) 2017

36 x 36in (91.44 x 91.44cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver. BC

Grinder Painting 8 (Black Perspective) 2017

14 x 14in (35.56 x 35.56 cm )

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver. BC

Grinder Painting 6 (White Lines) 2017

55 x 40in (139.7 x 101.6cm)

Acrylic on Panel

Jasmine Wallace

Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver. BC

Born in 1978 Prince George, Canada
Lives and works in Vancouver, Canada

Education

2010
– MFA, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

2005
– BFA, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Solo Exhibitions

2018
– February 1st-March 3rd, Z Gallery Arts, Vancouver, British Columbia

2015
– Jasmine Wallace, Robert Lynds Gallery, Vancouver, British Columbia

2013
– Jasmine Wallace, Robert Lynds Gallery, Vancouver, British Columbia

2010
– The Best of all Possible Worlds, MFA Thesis Exhibition, Katherine E. Nash Gallery, University of Minnesota

Selected Group Exhibitions

2016
– XXV Access Auction Fundraiser, Access Gallery, Vancouver, British Columbia

2015
– A Vibrant Assemblage, Access Gallery, Vancouver, British Columbia

2015
– ArtBeat, Belkin Residence, Vancouver, British Columbia

2014
– ArtBeat, Belkin Residence, Vancouver, British Columbia

2013
– Super Natural Industry, Robert Lynds Gallery, Vancouver, British Columbia

2013
– Sussurates, Robert Lynds Gallery, Vancouver, British Columbia

2012
– Precipice, Seattle Design Centre, Seattle, Washington

2010
– The Drawing Room, Pendulum Gallery, Vancouver, British Columbia

2010
– NCECA, “National Graduate Exhibition”, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

2009
– Diverse Perspectives, Minnesota State University, Mankado, Minnesota

2007-2009
– Fresh Works, Quarter Gallery, University of Minnesota

2008
– Hardscapes and Softscapes, Northrup King Building, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Teaching Experience

2012-2017
– Instructor Ceramics, JustPotters, JustWork Economic Initiative, Vancouver, British
Columbia

2008-2010
– Instructor Ceramics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Curatorial Projects

2010
– Tangible Digital Matter, Wilson Library, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Residencies

2003
– Guldagergard Ceramic Centre, Skaelskor, Denmark

Grants/Awards

2017
– DTES Arts Grant, Vancouver Foundation, Vancouver, British Columbia

2007-2010
– Graduate Art Scholarship, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

2009
– Dedalus Nominee, Dedalus Foundation, New York, NY

2009
– Northern Clay Center Ceramics Award, Northern Clay Center, Minneapolis

2003
– Research Fellowship- Guldagergard Denmark, NSCAD University, Halifax, NS

Publications

2015
– MagTear 99, Robert Lynds Gallery, Vancouver, British Columbia

2013
– MagTear 89, MagTear 88¸ Robert Lynds Gallery, Vancouver, British Columbia

2010
– The Drawing Room, Vancouver Drawn Festival Catalogue, Vancouver, British Columbia

2010
– NCECA Catalogue, Philadelphia Conference Exhibition Guide

2010
– Minnesota Women Ceramic Artists Exhibition Review, Ceramics Monthly, March Issue

2004/2005 & 2003/2004
– NSCAD University Annual Report

URBAN NARRATIVES | JASMINE WALLACE
Artist Reception: Thursday, February 1st. 6PM – 8PM
On View: February, 1st – March, 10th. 2018
Gallery Hours: Wed – Sat 11AM – 5AM. And by Appointment
Location: 102 – 1688 West 1st Avenue, Vancouver. BC. Canada. V6J 1G1
Contact: [email protected]

Grinder Painting 8 (Black Perspective), 2017

35.56 * 35.56cm (14*14in)

Acrylic On Panel

Jasmine Wallace @ Z Gallery Arts

The Eternal City

The city inspires the omnipresent grey in Jasmine Wallace’s paintings. This colour recalled in Charles Baudelaire’s poems describes sinuous streets, low heavy skies, and the sad charm of clouds swollen with water. This threatening grey, from a time past that is gloomy and cold, is entirely different from the shade used in Jasmine Wallace’s paintings. In her work this colour is dynamic, enveloping and inspiring; it is the colour of the city. Taking the tone of concrete, it allows the towers to rise above the roofs and recalls the intensity of entangled road networks. It reminds us of a city of pipes that cuts through houses and the city of electric wires that bring light. Slowly other colours emerge in the painting; they could represent a patch of blue sky, a poster washed out by the rain or the rainbow colour of a diluted drop of gas on asphalt. On the canvas, grey is mixed with white, black, green and blue, creating a palette of new colours which contrast each other in a geometric mesh. The lines cross and face at each other, they overlap, converge and repel each other. This urban maze could be a map or even the view of a mortar detail under a microscope. Colors play with lines, and we see in them, the footprints of a builder’s boot on scaffolding. The mud mixed with cement leaves the shadow of its passage.

Jasmine Wallace, a Canadian artist, finds her inspiration in the city, in its colours and its lines. The underground spaces dug by the people to shelter from the cold (metro, underground galleries) and the way they have been adapting their infrastructure fascinates her. This impulse of life we get from concrete, and the constructions and deconstructions appearing and disappearing inspire the motivations of the artist. The relatively new urban history of Canada influences her fascination. Unlike the vast heritage of the Western metropolis, the speed of modulation of Canadian cities allows one to witness enormous changes. Through the echoing of jackhammers and cranes stretching across the sky, buildings come out of the ground. But sometimes these manifestations end before they are aware realized, building plans are interrupted and then abandoned. In these empty spaces, one can read the contemporary writing of ruins. These places testify a time that is bygone or has never existed, and yet, a new life appears in these other spaces. Squatters and graffiti fill the rooms – like an ecosystem that doesn’t accept emptiness, entity life invests itself into every part of the city. 

This idea of adaptability, of a cycle, is found on Wallace’s canvas. Each sign of life, each step, participate in the construction. The evolution of a city is part of a loop that wraps to infinity. To point out these actions, Wallace leaves all signs of work visible on the canvas. As one builds a city with embossed patterns and shadowed passageways, with both simple and intricate meshes, similarly the artist weaves her work. The process is established by the accumulation of the repetitive stratification of forms and structures. What underlies these paintings is that we can build with anything. The freedom of construction is limitless, it allows one to consider enormous possibilities, and that is what has informed Jasmine Wallace’s particular method of abstraction.

 

La Ville éternelle

Le gris omniprésent qui soutient les peintures de Jasmine Wallace est celui de la ville. Un gris qui évoqua à Charles Baudelaire les images de ses poèmes. Il y décrivait de sinueuses rues, du ciel bas et lourd et du charme triste des nuages gonflés d’eau. Ce gris qui serait presque celui des limbes, menaçant, triste et froid, est tout autre dans la peinture de Jasmine Wallace. Pour elle, il est dynamique, enveloppant, inspirant. Il est la couleur de la ville, celle qui, bétonnée, permet aux tours de monter au dessus des toits ; celle qui rappelle les croisements des réseaux routiers, amoureusement emmêlés et prometteurs d’évasion ; celle des tuyaux qui découpent les maisons et celle des fils électriques qui promettent la lumière. Par touches, d’autres couleurs émergent. Elles rappellent un coin de ciel bleu, une affiche que la pluie a délavée, l’arc-en-ciel que révèle une goutte d’essence diluée sur le goudron… Du blanc au noir en passant par le rose, le vert et le bleu, le gris se fait doucement boueux et se contraste dans un maillage géométrique. Les lignes se croisent et se toisent. Elles se chevauchent, s’attacher et se repoussent. Ce labyrinthe urbain pourrait aussi bien être une carte, que l’agrandissement d’un détails de mortier. Les couleurs se jouent des lignes. Un peu comme si l’on retrouvait l’empreinte qu’un ouvrier de chantier avait laissée sur l’assise d’un échafaudage. La boue mêlée au ciment laisse l’ombre de son passage.

Jasmine Wallace, canadienne, puise son inspiration des villes du nord, de ses couleurs et des lignes qu’elle offre. Les espaces sous terre que les hommes ont creusés pour s’abriter du froid (métro, galeries souterraines) et la manière dont ils ont créé leurs infrastructures, la fascine. Cette impulsion de vie qui transpire du béton, ces constructions et les déconstructions qui se forment, enrichit le geste de l’artiste. L’Histoire urbaine, relativement nouvelle du Canada, n’est certainement pas pour rien dans cette fascination. A contrario d’un lourd patrimoine établi depuis de longs siècles sur les territoires européens, la rapidité de modulation des villes canadiennes permet d’immenses changements. Après qu’aient chanté les marteaux-piqueurs et qu’aient dansé les grues, des bâtiments sortent de terre. Mais il arrive parfois que ces effusions se tarissent. Les bâtiments sont abandonnés, des plans de constructions sont interropu. Dans ces espaces vides peut se lire l’écriture contemporaine des ruines. Ces endroits témoignent d’un temps révolu ou qui n’a pas existé. Et pourtant, une nouvelle vie apparaît dans ces espaces de non-lieu. Les murs sont tagués et les pièces sont squattées. Comme l’écosystème naturel qui ne laisse aucune possibilité au vide, l’homme investit chaque parcelle de la ville.

Cette idée d’adaptabilité, de cycle, se retrouve dans la création de la toile. Chaque marque de vie, chaque étape, participe de la construction. Évolutive, la ville s’inscrit dans une boucle qui s’enroule à l’infini. C’est pour mettre en lumière ces échelons que Jasmine Wallace laisse visibles les marques sur la toile. Comme se construit une ville, avec des schémas très clairs ou des zones d’ombre, avec des maillages simples et d’autres alambiqués, l’artiste tisse ses œuvres. Le processus s’établit par la stratification répétitive des formes et des structures, dans une accumulation. Ce qui sous-tend dans ces peintures, c’est bien que l’on ne bâtit ni avec rien, ni sur rien. La liberté de construction est totale. Elle permet d’envisager d’immenses possibles et c’est d’ailleurs pour cela que Jasmine Wallace semble avoir choisi l’abstrait.

 

Sandra Barre, art critic